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Committees

Committee 1: All India Political Parties Meet:

 Agenda: “Uniform Civil Code.”

Dear Delegates,

Greetings from the Executive Board!

It is a privilege to be serving as the Executive Board of All India Political Parties Meet at RDIASMUN for the Global Summit 2.0. Here, we introduce you to the agenda of the committee in order facilitate your research. This document should not by any means bind your research to its limits. This guide is just an introduction to the agenda and serves as the starting point for your research. We expect you to be thoroughly researched about your portfolios as well as your party’s stand on the agenda at large. Under no circumstances can this document be cited as a substantial proof for any argument put forth, when the committee is in session. All the data must be analysed and interpreted by all so as to put forward a constructive argument. Feel free to revert back to the executive board for any queries or for any form of assistance that you may require. We look forward to meeting you all.

 

All the best!

About the Agenda (AIPPM)

About the Agenda:

Uniform Civil Code is proposed to formulate and implement personal laws of citizens of India which are applicable to all irrespective of their religion. It is an important issue regarding secularism in the Indian politics and also the most disputed one by India’s political left wing and the conservative religious groups and sects in defence of religious customs. Personal laws are distinguished from public law and cover marriage, divorce, inheritance, adoption and maintenance.

  • Background:
    • The origin of the UCC dates back to colonial India when the British government submitted its report in 1835 stressing the need for uniformity in the codification of Indian law relating to crimes, evidence, and contracts, specifically recommending that personal laws of Hindus and Muslims be kept outside such codification.
    • Increase in legislation dealing with personal issues in the far end of British rule forced the government to form the B N Rau Committee to codify Hindu law in 1941.
    • Based on these recommendations, a bill was then adopted in 1956 as the Hindu Succession Act to amend and codify the law relating to intestate or unwilled succession, among Hindus, Buddhists, Jains, and Sikhs.
      • However, there were separate personal laws for Muslim, Christian and Parsi.
    • In order to bring uniformity, the courts have often said in their judgments that the government should move towards a UCC.
      • The judgement in the Shah Bano case(1985) is well known.
      • Another case was the Sarla Mudgal Case (1995), which dealt with issue of bigamy and conflict between the personal laws existing on matters of marriage.
    • By arguing that practices such astriple talaq and polygamy impact adversely the right of a woman to a life of dignity, the Centre has raised the question whether constitutional protection given to religious practices should extend even to those that are not in compliance with fundamental rights.
  • Implications of Uniform Civil Code on Personal Laws:
    • Protection to Vulnerable Section of Society:
      • The UCC aims to provide protection to vulnerable sections as envisaged by Dr. B.R. Ambedkar including women and religious minorities, while also promoting nationalistic fervor through unity.
    • Simplification of Laws:
      • The code will simplify the complex laws around marriage ceremonies, inheritance, succession, adoptions making them one for all. The same civil law will then be applicable to all citizens irrespective of their faith.
    • Adhering to Ideal of Secularism:
      • Secularism is the objective enshrined in the Preamble; a secular republic needs a common law for all citizens rather than differentiated rules based on religious practices.
    • Gender Justice:
      • If a UCC is enacted, all personal laws will cease to exist. It will do away with gender biases in existing laws.
    • Challenges:
      • Exceptions in Central Family Laws:
        • The preliminary sections in all central family law Acts enacted by Parliament since Independence declare that they will apply to “the whole of India except the state of Jammu and Kashmir.”
          • A Second exception was added in 1968 in all these Acts, pronouncing that “nothing herein contained shall apply to the Renoncants in the Union Territory of Pondicherry.”
          • A third exception, none of these Acts applies in Goa, Daman and Diu.
          • A fourth exception, relating to the north-eastern states of Nagaland and Mizoram, emanates from Articles 371A and 371G of the Constitution, decreeing that no parliamentary legislation will replace the customary law and religion-based system for its administration.

Committee 2: UN General Assembly

Agenda: Deliberation on Climate Change- Building of Climate Resilient Technologies for Sustainable Development Goals.”

Dear Delegates,

Greetings from the Executive Board!

It is a privilege to be serving as the Executive Board of UN General Assembly at RDIASMUN for the Global Summit 2.0. Here, we introduce you to the agenda of the committee in order facilitate your research. This document should not by any means bind your research to its limits. This guide is just an introduction to the agenda and serves as the starting point for your research. We expect you to be thoroughly researched about your portfolios as well as your party’s stand on the agenda at large. Under no circumstances can this document be cited as a substantial proof for any argument put forth, when the committee is in session. All the data must be analysed and interpreted by all so as to put forward a constructive argument. Feel free to revert back to the executive board for any queries or for any form of assistance that you may require. We look forward to meeting you all.

All the best!

About the Agenda (UNGA)

About the Agenda:

One of the biggest challenges facing the international community today is the issue of climate change and its effects. Climate change is occurring as a result of certain gases building up in the Earth’s atmosphere. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the recent accumulations in the Earth’s atmosphere of heat-trapping “greenhouse gases” have been caused by a number of factors, but the two factors most at fault are the burning of fossil fuels such as coal and oil, and widespread deforestation. These gases prevent heat from escaping to space, somewhat like the glass panels of a greenhouse.

Greenhouse gases are necessary to life as we know it because they keep the planet’s surface at an optimal temperature to sustain human life. However, as the concentrations of these gases continue to increase in the atmosphere, the Earth’s temperature rises above normal levels. According to data from the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA), the Earth’s average surface temperature has increased by about 1.4˚F in the last 100 years. While this doesn’t seem like a large increase, it has still had major impacts on the Earth’s climate.

These threats have aroused widespread international concern and demands for action. Back in the early 90s, Governments came together to draft the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, which came into force in 1994. The Convention envisaged two main strategies to address global warming: mitigation and adaptation. Mitigation involves finding ways to slow the emissions of GHGs or to store them, or to absorb them in forests or other carbon sinks. Adaptation, on the other hand, involves coping with climatic change – taking measures to reduce the negative effects, or exploit the positive ones, by making appropriate adjustments.

We are also witnessing a moment of unprecedented technological advance. From the discovery of fire to the invention of the automobile, human development has been marked by our technological capacity. But in this new computer age, so much is changing so quickly. This rapid advance of technology – connecting people, helping us understand our world and opening better ways of doing business – bodes well for the future of our planet and everyone who lives on it. We must use technology to accelerate climate action and open the door to a stable, secure future on a peaceful, prosperous planet.

Technology is already changing the foundation on which we build healthy societies – from cheaper, cleaner energy to sustainable transportation to smart agriculture. And technology is helping people adapt to impacts that are almost certain to appear due to the emissions already released into the climate system.

One look at recent headlines shows the transformative power of technology. During 2017 record-breaking Atlantic hurricane season, scientists used technology to quickly establish the link between warmer waters and stronger storms – data that can also be fed into parametric insurance platforms to deliver immediate relief following a severe storm. The rebuilding of some islands is being led by notable tech voices and innovators like Elon Musk and Richard Branson. The idea is that renewable energy and battery storage can be used by islands like Puerto Rico and others to build back better and more resilient in the face of future impacts. All of this is happening as more and more companies join Google, Microsoft and Apple in the move to 100% clean energy under RE100 and other initiatives. These are all examples of how technology can spark climate action that allows companies and governments to serve an increasing – and increasingly climate change-aware – population. They also show the inter-relationships with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), where acting on climate also addresses public health, energy access, food and water security and many more sustainable development issues.

Committee 3: UN Commission on Status of Women

Agenda: Deliberation on political and economic empowerment of women.”

Dear Delegates,

Greetings from the Executive Board!

It is a privilege to be serving as the Executive Board of UN Commission on Status of Women at RDIASMUN for the Global Summit 2.0. Here, we introduce you to the agenda of the committee in order facilitate your research. This document should not by any means bind your research to its limits. This guide is just an introduction to the agenda and serves as the starting point for your research. We expect you to be thoroughly researched about your portfolios as well as your party’s stand on the agenda at large. Under no circumstances can this document be cited as a substantial proof for any argument put forth, when the committee is in session. All the data must be analysed and interpreted by all so as to put forward a constructive argument. Feel free to revert back to the executive board for any queries or for any form of assistance that you may require. We look forward to meeting you all.

All the best!

About the Agenda (UNSCW)

About the Agenda:

Topic Background

Women have been economically, socially, culturally, and politically subjugated in communities across the globe for decades. The traditional role of women has been misconstrued as the sole caretakers of the house, food, and children, thereby leading to limited political participation, lesser pay in the workplace, and limited civil liberties. In nations such as India and China, many female daughters are either abandoned or killed because of the preference for male children, and such actions should be condemned and prevented by local governments. National governments hold significant influence over the progress of a nation by implementing laws and carrying out actions to promote gender equality.

In 2012, a draft constitution put in place by Egypt’s government ignored women’s rights and democratic freedoms. The ratification of this constitution could pose a threat to many liberties of women including the ability to inherit property, pass on citizenship to their children, earn equal wages, and the option to decisions independent of male family members.

There are many other examples of governments that are responding to the rising global revolution for women’s rights. The Libyan government, in previous years, had a slow progression of women’s rights due to the cultural and social values that subjugated women for years. Under the rule of Muammar Gaddafi, former dictator of Libya, women served small roles in government such as bodyguards, but few women were politically involved in government decisions. Today, women participate in ministries such as health and social affairs in the Libyan government.

The Fourth World Conference on Women, in Beijing, China, in September of 1995, resulted in the development of a five-year plan to enhance the women’s rights by addressing their health, advancing their education and promoting their independence. Several nations have initiated further advancement of women’s rights as a result of the Beijing Women’s Conference. The government plays a huge role in determining the principles that its citizens follow, and for that reason it is important to improve society’s gender equality stance.

Political Equality

It is imperative for women to become politically active within all nations, in order to provide a more objective view with regards to legislation and government action, whether it be through gender quotas, reforming constitutional law, or increasing media involvement. A 2012 UN report stated that 19.7 percent of parliament members internationally were women, which is a 75 percent increase since the year 1995, when women made up 11.3 percent of seats globally. Though the numbers are slowly increasing, the number of women representing individual governments is still low, and unequal to the political representation by men. In what ways can the government progress with regards to equal representation for women and set an example for other nations? How can we encourage women to become more politically aware.

Economic Equality

To integrate women into society, they must be given equal opportunities to become educated through primary education and college, along with job training, which will further the progress of incorporating women into the working world.

One type of job training is entrepreneurship, or starting a business. A woman in a rural area, for example, may want to buy a cow and sell its milk. To buy a cow, however, she needs money. Microfinance and small loans are ways to successfully help a woman who is trying to start a business. However many women are financially illiterate and are unable to receive fair services from banks and financial institutions.

One NGO that focuses on gender equality is Women for Women, an international organization that works towards promoting equality by ensuring health, education, and economic stability.12 The organization provides general education, job training, and decision making guidance through an efficient program, which is currently being implemented in 8 nations. By spreading knowledge to women globally, Women for Women is effective in reducing the marginalization of women and promoting equal representation for women.

How can we promote education to place women at the same level as men? How can we promote economic stability for women trying to advance in the working world ?

International Press

International Press Delegation

S. No

Content

1.

About the Committee

2.

Forms of Media

3

Research Methodology

4.

Requirements of Reporters

5.

Code of Conduct

6.

Tips for Reporters

  1. About the Committee

The International Press was established in the year 1948 in the UN, and it has always strived to bring out the truth to the people. The Press has its own stand in providing the factual and enlightening information, which frees people from ignorance thereby functioning as an investigative and versatile form of communication for the masses. The International Press endeavors in promoting awareness and to wake up the conscious of the human mind to the reality and authenticity about the events occurring in the world. It works tirelessly and with diligence in providing the truth, disclosing and elucidating on the debate among the delegates of the notable committee. The most important function is that it acts a watchdog, and keeps the decision makers in line, and holds them answerable and responsible for any kind of actions taken. Thus the International Press, with the collaboration of reporters, and photographers has always been an unconventional way of information, knowledge, realism, and a humane approach. The INTERNATIONAL PRESS has always followed the path of truth and certainty, because of which it is verifiable and reliable. It has remained strong in its stance, and even brought out the dilemmas and conspiracies in the public realm. Through the support of various modes of communication, co-operation, and elucidation, the delegates of INTERNATIONAL PRESS act in a liberated and unconventional way with authorization to cover up all attributes and features of the MUN conference.

  1. Forms of Media

There are many different types of media, but they can be divided into two categories: textual and visual. Textual media refers to formats that only include written text. Except for informal opinion articles, which reporters can employ to write wittier, funny, and innovative pieces, they normally don’t have much room for comedy and are primarily formal. Articles and interviews are examples of textual media. Visual media is more appealing, eye-catching, and artistic than other types of media. They incorporate the use of as little text as possible and as much imagery as possible. They are, however, more difficult to portray because the reporter must transmit the message clearly for easy interpretation. Illustrations, pictures, films, and visual graphics are examples of visual media.

  • Textual Media

Digital media such as social media, blogs, visual graphics, television channels, and so on, as well as classic print media such as books, newspapers, and so on, are all examples of modern media forms. Reporters will have the ability to provide content in such modern formats this year. Delegates from the international press should be able to provide a variety of written content, including news stories, opinion pieces on committee debates, interviews, and casual articles. For a reporter, getting basic facts and information wrong can be dangerous, so comprehending the circumstances and the problems being debated in the committee is critical. If a reporter is unable to do so, he or she should approach the dais with a letter requesting explanation. However, the reporter must be present in the committee for the entire session or for an hour or two, depending on the content he or she wishes to publish, in order to acquire detailed and accurate information about the committee procedures. A refined and quality piece will be free of factual inaccuracies and assumptions, will include quotes and interviews, and will be a unique work. The types of textual content that can be presented in the International Press are as follows.

-News Pieces

The most prevalent form of reporting is news articles. They are fact-based articles that state crucial details regarding a committee’s procedures, some background information, and information about the committee’s agenda. Remember that every piece must meet a certain level of accuracy. Reporters should take care to get the facts straight, and if in question, they should seek clarification from the delegate or the Executive Board mentioned. The majority of the writing for the newsletter will be news reporting, based on the Reporters’ observations of debates, caucuses, resolutions, press releases, and interviews during the numerous RDIAS MUN committee simulations.

-Opinion Pieces

The reporter’s viewpoint on a topic is usually expressed in opinion pieces. An excellent opinion piece contains a compelling idea as well as a set of equally compelling justifications. Because the facts and views offered in an opinion piece are judged, reporters must carefully consider the case they will make and how it will be presented in order to engage a larger audience. After they’ve finished reporting from the council, reporters can contribute Op-Eds for the newsletter, which may include their thoughts on the agenda. Editorials or op-eds do not need to include details about what happened in the council/committee; instead, they should focus on the author’s thoughts on the topic at hand. The quality of editorials and op-eds must be extremely good.

Writing and expression, as well as publication, will be at the Editorial Board’s discretion. Editorials and Op-Eds, to put it plainly, differ from news pieces in terms of substance rather than events.

-Interviews

Another typical approach of acquiring information and presenting data is through interviews. During breaks or lobbying sessions, reporters may question delegates or even the Executive Board. Inside the committee room, reporters are not permitted to conduct interviews. The reporter can send a message to the individual who will be questioned and conduct the interview outside if he or she so desires. The number of questions should be kept to a bare minimum while still being significant. Reporters must also keep in mind that innovation is an important component of excellent journalism. Interviews should not be limited to committee delegates, but should also include members of the Executive Board and the Secretariat.

Interviews can cover a wide range of topics, including overall conference sentiment, expectations, committee proceedings, and even amusing, interactive quizzes. Reporters, on the other hand, should never ask an interviewee anything that is disrespectful or makes them feel uncomfortable. The interviewee has the right to refuse to answer any question and should never be forced to do so under any circumstances.

  • Visual Media

Journalists can cover committee meetings with visual content, such as images, films, and visual graphics, in addition to written content. Visual material is strongly supported by journalists since it is an unconventional, appealing, modern, and creative manner of reporting. The essential reporting criteria apply here as well, just as they do in textual media.

-Photography

Reporters now have the option of taking images in addition to typical text reporting. Throughout the committee session, photographs of the events and the delegates are permitted. Photojournalism, on the other hand, should not be treated lightly, and a few basic guidelines should be followed. The delegates’ images should be candid and informal, as well as professional in nature. A delegate raising a placard, discussion of the resolution, and informal discussion among delegates are all examples of good committee photography.

The subjects of the photographs should not be staring directly into the camera, or else the photos would appear staged. Journalists may take photographs to accompany their articles or to publish them as a separate piece. The formal structure of photography as well as its storytelling value will be considered while judging it. Journalists must carry their own cameras as well as any necessary cables for photo transfer. RDIAS MUN is not liable for any missing or damaged items.

 

  1. Research Methodology

You can use the following guidelines for effective research. You must be adequately prepared to understand the debate.

  • Go through the backgrounds for basic understanding of the agenda and then the documents and links it mentions. The background guide can be obtained from the website of the conference.
  • Read about the agenda and various perspectives on it. Aid and form an opinion.
  • Understanding the legal, social, cultural and economic implications of the debate.
  1. Requirements of Reporters
  • The time for submission of the materials, will be announced as the INTERNATIONAL PRESS session begins.
  • The word limit for all articles for the newsletter is 150-200. Do not exceed or it will cause a problem in the layout.
  • Submit all your articles in Times New Roman and in font size 14.
  • Delegates are to bring their own laptops, pen drives, and other electronic devices needed.
  • Delegates are to be in charge of their own possessions.
  • Committee allotments will be given beforehand and delegates have to adhere by the given schedule.
  • Apart from the materials required, a press delegate has to also do editing work.
  1. Code of conduct

The International Press Committee is a unique committee with its own set of qualities. As a result, certain laws and regulations are only applicable to International Press delegates in order to ensure good functioning and uniformity in the conference and committee:

  1. Reporters are expected to be respectful and polite to every delegate, staff member, and conference executive.
  2. At times, reporters may not be permitted to enter committee rooms. The International Press delegates are to follow the rules set by the Executive Boards of respective committees, and no violation of them will be tolerated.
  3. Reporters are advised to carry an active cell phone at all times.
  4. No act of plagiarism of material from any online, tangible, or literary source will be tolerated.
  5. Do not indulge in any form of reporting which has your personal likes or dislikes for a person/country/religion.
  6. Do not write any reports without adequate amount of knowledge; make sure your reports are accurate.
  7. Select an interviewee who you think is smart and witty, or informative, or someone who has something important to say. One can interview delegates as well as EB Members.
  8. Proof-read articles before submission so that they are well written, with no grammatical errors. This will make the work of editors a little less burdened.
  9. One has to be in the character of a reporter and should not deviate from the truth.
  1. Tips for Reporters
  1. Research is something that is plainly required for a MUN, yet it is also something that is frequently overlooked. The more study you do, the more confidence you will be in all of the committees, not just the International Press. Reporters must be aware of what is going on in the committee about which they are writing a story; else, they would sit blankly and waste their time. In the case of your own committee, active participation is highly valued, and for that reason, one should conduct extensive research.
  2. When reporting from the beats, it is extremely advised that reporters take notes on what is said in committee. While a recording device is useful, it is preferable for the reporters to write down the events on paper because the sound may or may not be accurately recorded in this situation. For an interview, however, it is preferable to use a recording device.
  3. Nobody enjoys reading papers with long, complicated vocabulary and long, perplexing sentences. Reporters should maintain the wording of their stories straightforward and professional, both formal and informal. It is forbidden to use slang, acronyms, or unsuitable language. Reporters should keep in mind that they are covering a formal event.
  4. Accuracy is crucial. Reporters should take care to spell the names and quote the delegates correctly, get the facts right, and avoid grammatical errors.
  5. Only opinion pieces based on the reporter’s personal viewpoints are permitted. The reporter should avoid expressing his or her own views in other types of articles. In interviews, the reporter may express reservations and pose questions to delegates, but he or she should never express personal opinion explicitly.
  6. Reporters should try to avoid yes/no questions in interviews. Try to get as many detailed, opinionated, and comprehensive answers as possible.
  7. Ensure that the headline is catchy and attracts immediate attention.
  8. Make use of as many media platforms as possible to ensure maximum coverage.

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